2021 Reading Challenge

A list like this came down on Facebook, so I thought I’d try it. I’ve changed up the items to make them less inane —more meaningful, diverse, and hopefully interesting. I’ll update it as I go along; if you want to play, please do so as well, in the comments, to give others (well, me) some recommendations for good books. Do note whether or not you actually consider your choice a good book.

Karyn’s 2021 Reading Challenge

At some point in 2021, read a book that falls into each category. One book can not be used for two categories. Books for any audience, in any language, read on any platform, are acceptable. It can be a book you have read before, but you have to read it again in its entirety.

If you want to share this as you go, I suspect your friends will appreciate the recommendations. I would at least.

Having finished a book last night, I’ll start, and update as the year goes on.

Read a book…

1       set in a school.

2       featuring the medical profession.

3       with dual universes.

4       by an author who is deceased.

5       strongly advocating a particular ideology.

6       with a protagonist with the same name as a family member.—The Cybernetic Tea Shop (2016), by Meredith Katz; short, simple story with interesting world-building that deserves a deeper exploration by an author with a more sophisticated writing style; also a tad derivative from Philip K. Dick’s We Can Build You; protagonist Clara is an AI and robotics specialist

7          by an author with only one published book.

8          in the 900s of the Dewey Decimal System.

9          set in a Mediterranean country.

10        with a title related to the word “fire”.

11        set in Canada.

12        that teaches you a new skill.

13        incorporates a cultural mythology.—Wildfire at Midnight (1953), by Mary Stewart; I really did enjoy this one, although the relationship between protagonists is rather dated; ; set on the Isle of Skye, the mystery revolves around Celtic mythology

14        set in Australia.

15        mentioned in another book.

16        set before the 18th century.

17        with a character on the run.

18        with steampunk elements.

19        with a deckled edge.

20        made into a TV series or movie.

21        by a Canadian author not set in Canada.

22        that is a family saga.

23        with an unexpected ending.

24        that you think should be read in schools.

25        with multiple character POV.

26        with an author of colour.

27        set in Africa.

28        that includes a historical event you know little about.

29        featuring the environment.

30        Watch out for dragons!

31        set in India.

32        with an unsympathetic protagonist or an anti-hero.

33        that features adoption.

34        that you’d rate 5 stars.

35        that includes magic.

36        with a nameless narrator.

37        by two authors.—Dash & Lily’s Book of Dares (2010), by Rachel Cohn and David Levithan; sweet, somewhat predictable YA novel

38        recommended by your local library.

39        that is an alternate-history novel.

40        that you like, recommended by a friend.

41        with an endorsement by a famous author on the cover.

42        that is historical biographical fiction.

43        with a character with a pet cat.

44        that features a garden.

46        that is a bildungsroman (coming of age novel).

46        that won a National Book Award—any nation, any year.

47        with a significant character with a disability.

48        intended for a teen audience.

49        with a flavour, colour, or scent in the title.

50        that focuses on environmental issues.

51        published in 2021.

52        that repeats one of the previous 51 categories.

Here are my and others’ recommendations (the list is in italics so that I don’t get confuse while scrolling!):

Read a book…

1 set in a school.

2 featuring the medical profession.

3 with dual universes.—The Eyre Affair, by Jasper Fforde

4 by an author who is deceased.

5 strongly advocating a particular ideology.

6 with a protagonist with the same name as a family member.—This will depend, of course, on your family…

7 by an author with only one published book.

8 in the 900s of the Dewey Decimal System.

9 set in a Mediterranean country.—Moira recommends My Family and Other Animals, by Gerald Durrell

10 with a title related to the word “fire”.

11 set in Canada.

12 that teaches you a new skill.

13 that incorporates a cultural mythology.

14 set in Australia.

15 mentioned in another book.

16 set before the 18th century.

17 with a character on the run.

18 with steampunk elements.

19 with a deckled edge.

20 made into a TV series or movie.

21 by a Canadian author not set in Canada.—Anil’s Ghost, by Michael Ondaatje

22 that is a family saga.

23 with an unexpected ending.—The Thief, by Megan Whalen Turner

24 that you think should be read in schools.—Moira recommends Indian Horse

25 with multiple character POV.

26 with an author of colour.

27 set in Africa.

28 that includes a historical event you know little about.

29 featuring the environment.

30 Watch out for dragons!

31 set in India.

32 with an unsympathetic protagonist or an anti-hero.

33 that features adoption.

34 that you’d rate 5 stars.—Moira recommends The Goldfinch, by Donna Tarte

35 that includes magic.

36 with a nameless narrator.

37 by two authors.

38 recommended by your local library.

39 that is an alternate-history novel.

40 that you like, recommended by a friend.

41 with an endorsement by a famous author on the cover.

42 that is historical biographical fiction.—Remarkable Creatures, by Tracey Chevalier

43 with a character with a pet cat.

44 that features a garden.

46 that is a bildungsroman (coming of age novel).

46 that won a National Book Award—any nation, any year.

47 with a significant character with a disability.

48 intended for a teen audience.

49 with a flavour, colour, or scent in the title.

50 that focuses on environmental issues.

51 published in 2021.

52 that repeats one of the previous 51 categories.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s